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Beck & Pauli, Lith.,  Birds Eye View of the Town of Nantucket..

Beck & Pauli, Lith., Birds Eye View of the Town of Nantucket..

  • $ 28,000.00


Beck & Pauli, Lith.

Birds Eye View of the Town of Nantucket..

Published J.J. Stoner, Madison, WI, 1881

Beck & Pauli, Lith. Milwaukee, WI

Lithograph

Image size: 19 ½ x 27 ¼”

Frame size: 27 ⅛ x 35”

 

By the early 1880’s Nantucket was well on its way to becoming a summer resort, in no small measure because of the promotional efforts of the Old Colony Railroad and its affiliated steamboat companies. Their guides to the watering places of the southern Massachusetts coast touted Nantucket as a "quaint old place" with cobblestone streets, unspoiled natural beauty fading relics of past glories, even a town crier who announced meetings, lectures, and steamboat arrivals with a fish horn and a bell. They described the town of Nantucket as "a marine curiosity shop," where summer sojourners could rub shoulders with old sea salts who, like the Ancient Mariner, had many a "rhyme to relate." 
Promotional literature promised large and commodious hotels (several of them pictured on the vignettes here), opportunities for bluefishing, sailing, and sea bathing. For "invalids, wearied brain-workers, and tired-out business men," Nantucket offered "invigorating sea air and quiet repose," a retreat from the hurly-burly of the city, and daily exposure to "the ministrations of Nature." Apparently the climate was so healthful that its natives enjoyed great longevity. Even summer visitors could benefit from the island's miraculous freedom from disease: "Sea breezes carry off every vestige of noxious gases or impure influences." 
This view of the town of Nantucket illustrates its growing orientation to tourism. At this point steamboats made two daily trips during the summer, and numerous local vessels were available for excursions around the island. By the 1880s there were six hotels in town, two in Siasconset, and one in Wauwinet, as well as many boardinghouses to accommodate the overflow. Siasconset (pictured in the inset) was known as the "watering-place within a watering place," the seashore retreat of Nantucketers who wanted to get away from it all. During this period it became a favored resort for the New York and Boston theater crowd, and the residents of 'Sconset's fifty fishing shacks soon found themselves surrounded by a summer colony.
Printed by Beck and Pauli (Milwaukee lithographic firm, 1876-89) Stoner chose one of the most prolific and skilled of the 19th century lithographers. After the Civil War, the Midwest became a leading center of American lithographic production. This prominence was due to the large number of German settlers in the area, such as the prolific Beck and Pauli, who brought their expertise from Germany, the birthplace of lithography in 1796. They printed views of cities and towns across the United States, especially in the West, which was experiencing a population-boom in the second half of the 19th century. 
Promotional literature promised large and commodious hotels (several of them pictured on the vignettes here), opportunities for bluefishing, sailing, and sea bathing. For "invalids, wearied brain-workers, and tired-out business men," Nantucket offered "invigorating sea air and quiet repose," a retreat from the hurly-burly of the city, and daily exposure to "the ministrations of Nature." Apparently the climate was so healthful that its natives enjoyed great longevity. Even summer visitors could benefit from the island's miraculous freedom from disease: "Sea breezes carry off every vestige of noxious gases or impure influences." 
This view of the town of Nantucket illustrates its growing orientation to tourism. At this point steamboats made two daily trips during the summer, and numerous local vessels were available for excursions around the island. By the 1880s there were six hotels in town, two in Siasconset, and one in Wauwinet, as well as many boardinghouses to accommodate the overflow. Siasconset (pictured in the inset) was known as the "watering-place within a watering place," the seashore retreat of Nantucketers who wanted to get away from it all. During this period it became a favored resort for the New York and Boston theater crowd, and the residents of 'Sconset's fifty fishing shacks soon found themselves surrounded by a summer colony.
Printed by Beck and Pauli (Milwaukee lithographic firm, 1876-89) Stoner chose one of the most prolific and skilled of the 19th century lithographers. After the Civil War, the Midwest became a leading center of American lithographic production. This prominence was due to the large number of German settlers in the area, such as the prolific Beck and Pauli, who brought their expertise from Germany, the birthplace of lithography in 1796. They printed views of cities and towns across the United States, especially in the West, which was experiencing a population-boom in the second half of the 19th century. 

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